southcarolinadove
southcarolinadove:

An 1860 policitical cartoon titled “South Carolina’s ‘Ultimatum’”, featuring Governor Francis Pickens of South Carolina and President James Buchanan, Fort Sumter is visible in the background
Pickens: “Mr President, if you don’t surrender that fort at once, I’ll be blowed if I don’t fire
Buchanan: “Oh, don’t! Governor Pickens, don’t fire! till I get out of office

southcarolinadove:

An 1860 policitical cartoon titled “South Carolina’s ‘Ultimatum’”, featuring Governor Francis Pickens of South Carolina and President James Buchanan, Fort Sumter is visible in the background

Pickens: “Mr President, if you don’t surrender that fort at once, I’ll be blowed if I don’t fire

Buchanan: “Oh, don’t! Governor Pickens, don’t fire! till I get out of office

dead-people-cant-stand
dead-people-cant-stand:

doctorbatman:

dead-people-cant-stand:

theatrousdrachen:

Post-mortem photography (also known as memorial portraiture or a mourning portrait) is the practice of photographing the recently deceased. These photographs of deceased love ones were a normal part of American and European culture in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Commissioned by grieving families, postmortem photographs not only helped in the grieving process, but often represented the only visual remembrance of the deceased and were among a family’s most precious possessions

This is actually most likely a pre-mortem, meaning it was taken before death

Exemplified by the fact that it looks like her eyes are both open and closed at the same time? Something that happened when people blinked in those photos?

her eyes are both open. she just has pale blue eyes so it hows up as faint and light gray in the picture

dead-people-cant-stand:

doctorbatman:

dead-people-cant-stand:

theatrousdrachen:

Post-mortem photography (also known as memorial portraiture or a mourning portrait) is the practice of photographing the recently deceased. These photographs of deceased love ones were a normal part of American and European culture in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Commissioned by grieving families, postmortem photographs not only helped in the grieving process, but often represented the only visual remembrance of the deceased and were among a family’s most precious possessions

This is actually most likely a pre-mortem, meaning it was taken before death

Exemplified by the fact that it looks like her eyes are both open and closed at the same time? Something that happened when people blinked in those photos?

her eyes are both open. she just has pale blue eyes so it hows up as faint and light gray in the picture

enigmarelle
littlepennydreadful:

Sir John Everett Millais, The Artist Attending the Mourning of a Young Girl c.1847 
From the Tate:
This early work, painted when Millais had just finished his training at the Royal Academy Schools, records a strange incident from Millais’s early career, of which there is no record in any of the published biographies or catalogues of the artist and his work. However, an unattributed inscription on the original backing to the picture (now lost) described the occasion which Millais depicted here as follows: ‘The painting represents an incident in Millais’s own life when he was sent for by people unknown to him, but who knew him to be a young artist, to draw a portrait of a girl in her coffin before her burial. The scene moved him so much that when he got home he made this sketch showing himself being asked to draw the girl’s portrait’.
The composition is arranged so that the spectator of the painting becomes a witness to Millais’s visit to the dead girl. The artist is seen from behind, hat in hand as a mark of respect and apparently communicating with a woman whom, it is to be assumed, is the mother of the dead girl. The coffin is pushed into the foreground, inviting the spectator to look from the same angle which Millais himself adopted in order to draw the girl. The motif of a dead girl laid out on an oblique, horizontal plane is comparable with Millais’s later treatment of female death in Ophelia (Tate N01506). Millais’s painting also serves as a visual record of the social rituals of death in early-Victorian England ; the white cloth covering the coffin is suggestive of innocence and was the colour traditionally used at the burials of children. Artists were often called upon to record the likeness of babies and children who had died prematurely through illness. The Liverpool Pre-Raphaelite artist, William Windus painted a portrait of his first son after he died aged seven months (Tate N04885). The loose handling of the paint in The Artist Attending the Mourning of a Young Girl can be attributed to the fact that it is apparently a ‘sketch’ from memory, but it may also be compared with the freer brushwork which characterises Millais’s early paintings before he came under the influence of Pre-Raphaelitism. An early self-portrait by Millais, also painted on board and dated 1847 (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), is comparable to the manner in which Millais has represented himself in this work. Millais later gave this painting to his friend and fellow Pre-Raphaelite, Charles Allston Collins (1828-1973), whom he had met in the mid-1840s when they were both students at the Royal Academy Schools.

littlepennydreadful:

Sir John Everett Millais, The Artist Attending the Mourning of a Young Girl c.1847

From the Tate:

This early work, painted when Millais had just finished his training at the Royal Academy Schools, records a strange incident from Millais’s early career, of which there is no record in any of the published biographies or catalogues of the artist and his work. However, an unattributed inscription on the original backing to the picture (now lost) described the occasion which Millais depicted here as follows: ‘The painting represents an incident in Millais’s own life when he was sent for by people unknown to him, but who knew him to be a young artist, to draw a portrait of a girl in her coffin before her burial. The scene moved him so much that when he got home he made this sketch showing himself being asked to draw the girl’s portrait’.

The composition is arranged so that the spectator of the painting becomes a witness to Millais’s visit to the dead girl. The artist is seen from behind, hat in hand as a mark of respect and apparently communicating with a woman whom, it is to be assumed, is the mother of the dead girl. The coffin is pushed into the foreground, inviting the spectator to look from the same angle which Millais himself adopted in order to draw the girl. The motif of a dead girl laid out on an oblique, horizontal plane is comparable with Millais’s later treatment of female death in Ophelia (Tate N01506). Millais’s painting also serves as a visual record of the social rituals of death in early-Victorian England ; the white cloth covering the coffin is suggestive of innocence and was the colour traditionally used at the burials of children. Artists were often called upon to record the likeness of babies and children who had died prematurely through illness. The Liverpool Pre-Raphaelite artist, William Windus painted a portrait of his first son after he died aged seven months (Tate N04885). The loose handling of the paint in The Artist Attending the Mourning of a Young Girl can be attributed to the fact that it is apparently a ‘sketch’ from memory, but it may also be compared with the freer brushwork which characterises Millais’s early paintings before he came under the influence of Pre-Raphaelitism. An early self-portrait by Millais, also painted on board and dated 1847 (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), is comparable to the manner in which Millais has represented himself in this work. Millais later gave this painting to his friend and fellow Pre-Raphaelite, Charles Allston Collins (1828-1973), whom he had met in the mid-1840s when they were both students at the Royal Academy Schools.

southcarolinadove
thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Etiquette: Martine’s Handbook and Vulgarisms in Conversation-  ”Civil War Era Etiquette: Martine’s Handbook and Vulgarisms in Conversation,” originally published in 1866 as a man’s guide to gentlemanly behavior.
Imagine how shocked the author would be to hear the profane greetings, writing and language used today, every sentence from a young girl/guy laced with the “F” bomb. 
How far we’ve come? or have we?
“The true aim of politeness, is to make those with whom you associate as well satisfied with themselves as possible. …it does whatever it can to accommodate their feelings and wishes in social intercourse.”
Today we care little of what those around us think of us. We live in a mentality of “you don’t like what I have to say” “F” you.
MEN NEVER
Curse or discuss “impolite” subjects when ladies are present
Leave a lady you know unattended, except with permission
Use tobacco in any form when ladies are present
Greet a lady in public unless she acknowledges you first (see “Always” #12)
Eat or drink while wearing gloves
Help a lady with her coat, cloak, shawl, etc.
Offer to bring a lady refreshments if they are available
Offer your arm to escort a lady (with whom you are acquainted) into or out of a building or a room at all social events, and whenever walking on uneven ground
Remove your hat when entering a building
Lift your hat to a lady when she greets you in public (Merely touching the brim or a slight “tip” of the hat was very rude)
LADIES NEVER
Grab your hoops or lift your skirts higher than is absolutely necessary to go up stairs
Lift your skirts up onto a chair or stool, etc.
Sit with your legs crossed (except at the ankles if necessary for comfort or habit)
Lift your skirts up onto the seat of your chair when sitting down (Wait for, or if necessary, ask for assistance when sitting down at a table or on a small light chair)
Speak in a loud, coarse voice
http://www.amazon.com/Civil-War-Era-Etiquette-Conversation/dp/0914046071

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Etiquette: Martine’s Handbook and Vulgarisms in Conversation-  ”Civil War Era Etiquette: Martine’s Handbook and Vulgarisms in Conversation,” originally published in 1866 as a man’s guide to gentlemanly behavior.

Imagine how shocked the author would be to hear the profane greetings, writing and language used today, every sentence from a young girl/guy laced with the “F” bomb. 

How far we’ve come? or have we?

“The true aim of politeness, is to make those with whom you associate as well satisfied with themselves as possible. …it does whatever it can to accommodate their feelings and wishes in social intercourse.”

Today we care little of what those around us think of us. We live in a mentality of “you don’t like what I have to say” “F” you.

MEN NEVER

Curse or discuss “impolite” subjects when ladies are present

Leave a lady you know unattended, except with permission

Use tobacco in any form when ladies are present

Greet a lady in public unless she acknowledges you first (see “Always” #12)

Eat or drink while wearing gloves

Help a lady with her coat, cloak, shawl, etc.

Offer to bring a lady refreshments if they are available

Offer your arm to escort a lady (with whom you are acquainted) into or out of a building or a room at all social events, and whenever walking on uneven ground

Remove your hat when entering a building

Lift your hat to a lady when she greets you in public (Merely touching the brim or a slight “tip” of the hat was very rude)


LADIES NEVER

Grab your hoops or lift your skirts higher than is absolutely necessary to go up stairs

Lift your skirts up onto a chair or stool, etc.

Sit with your legs crossed (except at the ankles if necessary for comfort or habit)

Lift your skirts up onto the seat of your chair when sitting down (Wait for, or if necessary, ask for assistance when sitting down at a table or on a small light chair)

Speak in a loud, coarse voice

http://www.amazon.com/Civil-War-Era-Etiquette-Conversation/dp/0914046071